Civil War Era 1865 Cathedral or Gothic pickle bottle 11 1/4″ – 8 available $250 each

$250.00

8 1/2″ priced at $300.00 ea
11 1/4″ priced at $350.00 ea
13 3/4″ priced at $500.00 ea
 
The Victorian Gothic design became popular on preserve ware starting in the 1840s continuing through the 1880s, though in the later years it seems the designs were less ornate.
 
The Victorian Gothic influence is known in glass houses in Stoddard, New Hampshire; Westford and Willington in Connecticut and others in the South Jersey – Philadelphia areas. Some pickle containers have initials embossed on the base.
 
Some collectors refer to these pickle bottles as “floral pickle jars” The diamond lattice, floral patterns, tulip crowns, stars and crosses are all common designs.
 
Smaller emerald green floral bottles often held spices or honey along with pickles.
 
This 11in Cathedral pickle bottle or antique pickle jar was manufactured by JN Bodine in 1865 which was incorporated as The Cohansey Glass Works in Bridgeton N. J. in 1879 and these bottles were sold to a company called Stout Dwyer and Wicks that had been established in the early 1860s as a canning house at the corner of Bank Street and Irving Avenue in Bridgeton, New Jersey. In the spring of 1865 John W. Stout gained full control of the company.
This particular antique pickle jar was filled with pickles and was loaded aboard the brig Baltic and placed in a shipment to Galveston Texas to help feed the vast number of Civil war soldiers stationed there awaiting their discharge from the military at the end of the Civil war between the North and South.
 

The use of Cathedral pickle bottles by Stout Dwyer and Wicks was not common knowledge until the recovery of this pickle bottle from a marked crate found aboard the shipwreck of the Baltic which had been lost in the Great Bahamian hurricane of 1866. Bottles with this design and this history are extremely rare. Bottles from this era contained not only pickles, but were used to preserve and market other food products, namely cherries, honey, mincemeat, lobsters spiced, mixed vegetables, Peppers and plum tomatoes.  Some of the bottles recovered from the “Baltic” contained French capers, still sealed with cork inserts. Products from France, such as capers, brandied cherries and olive Oil were frequent imports in the 1800s.

Certificate of Authenticity available $25.00. Contact us at info@historicsitesandshipwrecks.com

Click Photo to enlarge

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Description

8 1/2″ priced at $300.00 ea
11 1/4 ” priced at $350.00 ea
13 3/4″ priced at $500.00 ea
 
Contact us @ historiccj@aol.com for availability of sizes. 
The Victorian Gothic design became popular on preserve ware starting in the 1840s continuing through the 1880s, though in the later years it seems the designs were less ornate.
 
The Victorian Gothic influence is known in glass houses in Stoddard, New Hampshire; Westford and Willington in Connecticut and others in the South Jersey – Philadelphia areas. Some pickle containers have initials embossed on the base.
 
Some collectors refer to these pickle bottles as “floral pickle jars” The diamond lattice, floral patterns, tulip crowns, stars and crosses are all common designs.
 
Smaller emerald green floral bottles often held spices or honey along with pickles.
 
This 11in Cathedral pickle bottle or antique pickle jar was manufactured by JN Bodine in 1865 which was incorporated as The Cohansey Glass Works in Bridgeton N. J. in 1879 and these bottles were sold to a company called Stout Dwyer and Wicks that had been established in the early 1860s as a canning house at the corner of Bank Street and Irving Avenue in Bridgeton, New Jersey. In the spring of 1865 John W. Stout gained full control of the company.
This particular antique pickle jar was filled with pickles and was loaded aboard the brig Baltic and placed in a shipment to Galveston Texas to help feed the vast number of Civil war soldiers stationed there awaiting their discharge from the military at the end of the Civil war between the North and South.
 

The use of Cathedral pickle bottles by Stout Dwyer and Wicks was not common knowledge until the recovery of this pickle bottle from a marked crate found aboard the shipwreck of the Baltic which had been lost in the Great Bahamian hurricane of 1866. Bottles with this design and this history are extremely rare. Bottles from this era contained not only pickles, but were used to preserve and market other food products, namely cherries, honey, mincemeat, lobsters spiced, mixed vegetables, Peppers and plum tomatoes.  Some of the bottles recovered from the “Baltic” contained French capers, still sealed with cork inserts. Products from France, such as capers, brandied cherries and olive Oil were frequent imports in the 1800s.

Certificate of Authenticity available $25.00. Contact us @ historiccj@aol.com

Click Photo to enlarge