William Adams IV Spatterware Soup Cup & Saucer 100.00

$100.00

W.Adams IV Spongeware and Spatterware
 
It’s believed the Adams factory in Greenfield also produced Scottish Sponge ware and Spatterware much of it was done by means of cut sponges, and was first made in Staffordshire by William Adams at his Greenfield pottery in 1845 to 1850. In order to introduce it he procured persons from Scotland who understood the process. Adams is also said to have originated Mocha ware in the late eighteenth century in his factory at Colbridge (named after Mocha stone said to have been originally from Mocha in Arabia.) The dark markings simulating miniature trees and shrubs are caused by the infiltration of iron or manganese oxide solutions into the cracks of the stone and was used by Adams on cream colored earthenware.
 
These mugs were handmade and are an extremely rare one of a kind piece of Mocha ware that would have been used by the many soldiers awaiting release from the military in Galveston Texas at the end of the Civil war. 
 
William Adams IV was the son and first partner of William Adams III. In 1819 when he became partner, the name of the firm was changed to William Adam and Son, and subsequently to William Adams & Sons when three other sons joined the firm.

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$200 per set of cup and saucer. Contact us i@historicsitesandshipwrecks.com

W.Adams IV Spongeware and Spatterware
 
It’s believed the Adams factory in Greenfield also produced Scottish Sponge ware and Spatterware much of it was done by means of cut sponges, and was first made in Staffordshire by William Adams at his Greenfield pottery in 1845 to 1850. In order to introduce it he procured persons from Scotland who understood the process. Adams is also said to have originated Mocha ware in the late eighteenth century in his factory at Colbridge (named after Mocha stone said to have been originally from Mocha in Arabia.) The dark markings simulating miniature trees and shrubs are caused by the infiltration of iron or manganese oxide solutions into the cracks of the stone and was used by Adams on cream colored earthenware.
 
These mugs were handmade and are an extremely rare one of a kind piece of Mocha ware that would have been used by the many soldiers awaiting release from the military in Galveston Texas at the end of the Civil war. 
 
William Adams IV was the son and first partner of William Adams III. In 1819 when he became partner, the name of the firm was changed to William Adam and Son, and subsequently to William Adams & Sons when three other sons joined the firm.